Interactive Museum Exhibits

The scope of interactive multimedia museum exhibits ranges from simple touch-screens to multi-user, multi-screened, multi-input activities. In many ways these can be similar to interactive art installations, however, the biggest difference is that rather than conveying emotions, the exhibits tend to give information and facts.

Saffron Walden Museum Touchscreen by Heritage Interactive

This is a simple touchscreen solution where the user gains more information on the local area and different parts of the exhibits within the museum by touching them on the screen. This is relatively simple to implement and as long as the interface has been designed well, it is should be fairly intuitive for the user to operate.

Blue Planet Aquarium Copenhagen by Aivaf

Almost completely opposite to the simple touchscreen, this is a complete exhibition space within the aquarium that uses less virtual interfaces, and focuses more on physical activities. This involves the pulling of levers, or the touching of buttons, which is much more tactile and interesting for children as they interact with an object, and can see something happen either in the real world or on screen because of it.

Climate Change Miami by Ideum

An example of a multi-user exhibit, three users can control the information that is displayed on the main set of viewing screens via their personal touchscreens. As one of the users controls the area of the globe that is targeted, the other two select what information about that area they would like to know more about. The multi-user input  adds to the sense of interactivity and provides the potential to give each visitor a slightly different experience.

Around the world in different museums, there are many exhibits that are similar to these, some with combined elements from each. It is dependant on the specific exhibits target audience and age range as to what solution is preferable.

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